Category Archives: Stress management

How Toxic Are You?

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Is your body a toxic waste dump?

This is a simple question guide that will tell us early warning signs for the need of cleansing impurities or toxin build up in our body.

  1. Do you often feel tired or fatigued?
  2. Do you feel dizzy, foggy-headed or having trouble concentrating?
  3. Do you use coffee, cigarettes, candy or soda to get “up”?
  4. Do you eat fast, fatty, processed or fried foods?
  5. Do your bowels move less than twice a day?
  6. Do you experience intestinal gas and bloating or constipation?
  7. Do you experience headaches or yeast difficulties?
  8. Do you live with or near air and water pollution?
  9. Do you experience general aches and pains or arthritis?
  10. Do you have food allergies, or skin problems?
  11. Do you experience frequent back pains or sinus problems?
  12. Are you often exposed to chemicals, sedatives, or stimulants?
  13. Do you rarely exercise or feel sluggish or overweight?
  14. Have you done a cleansing program before?

If you answered “Yes” to three or more of these questions, or “no” to the last question, it would be desirable for you to purify your system of toxins.

Toxic-Body

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Celebrating Spring with Zen Healing Center!

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3rd Anniversary Specials at Zen Healing Center

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3rd Anniversary at Zen Healing Center!

Zen Healing Center is celebrating 3rd year anniversary and giving out specials services and giving gifts for those who stop by!

Three years have gone by since Zen Healing Center opened our clinic in Edina, MN. Here is a brief history of the clinic from its beginnings to presents!

Dr. Zen opened his clinic, Zen Chiropractic Inc. with the b11d45ff508640ad8d3cbe2211c24238slogan “Healing from Within” in
Bloomington, MN near the Mall of America. What started with humble beginnings with spending many hours of doing Japanese translation and community work helped to grow the clinic and eventually outgrow the Bloomington location.

After a year and a half, Dr. Zen was contacted by an owner of a massage spa business. Since they had an opening for space for the business, Dr. Zen decided to move his clinic into the massage business in Edina, MN. After 1 year of practicing Chiropractic in this location, the chiropractic practice outgrew the location again.

In 2013, after 6 months of searching, Dr. Zen found the current location in Edina MN. With the help of Fernanda Matsuda, his wife, they started a concept of integrating other healing moralities into his practice. An acupuncturist and massage therapist was added to the clinic and its name was changed the name to Zen Healing Center with the slogan of “Longevity and Wellness”.

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Dr. Zen’s brother, a graphic designer, made a logo based off the Japanese Family Crest. Since Dr. Zen’s last name translates to “Pine tree in a rice field,” a symbol of a Pine tree was used. In Japanese culture, a pine tree is a symbol of longevity, virtue, and youth.

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After a year and a half of opening Zen Healing Center, the clinic doubled in size. Demanding for expansion, additional rooms for acupuncture, massage, and an x-ray room were added.

“Starting with humble beginnings and moving fromIMG_8500s217 place to place reminds me of how I am grateful of my clients who referred their family and friends. As my goal in life, Dr. Gonstead has also seen humble beginnings from a one room on the top floor of a bank to a 29,000 square feet clinic and seeing 7 million people in his life time. After many years of changes, we are now working with the best administrative staff and providers that I have seen over years. Working for this office has rarely felt like work. As many difficult cases stop by Zen Healing Center, the more I am empathetic and excited to be help those who are in need.”

Zen Matsuda D.C. Co-Owner/Founder of Zen Healing Center

“Being part of the Zen Healing Center team means excitement and joy.IMG_5371 Throughout the years I have received many feedback from our clients stating how happy they are for finding a place where they can truly feel healing.  In the past three years, our clinic has expanded in size. We have added new services, improved our software, added new treatment rooms, digital x-rays and tests. Seeing our clients getting well is a huge motivation for all of our team members to keep improving so that we can serve them even better. We strive to keep expanding but our main goal is to keep focusing on the wellness of our existing and future clients.”

Fernanda Matsuda-Co-Owner/Founder of Zen Healing Center

“A year of experience Zen healing Center for me was pleasant, Aliceharmonizing, educating, and supporting.  The team work was wonderfully done with the communication and help among the team members.  I see that the clinic is growing in every aspect through hard-work and dedication to help people.  I very much enjoy and look forward to continuing work at Zen Healing Center.”

Alice Min Kang L. Ac

“Hello, I’m Stephanie and I started working at Zen Healing Center after the IMG_5369holidays this year. Previously I worked at a bank and this environment has proved to serve me much better. I really like that wellness is a focus here and I truly enjoy seeing the health of our patients improve as time goes on. I think we have something great here between Dr. Zen, Alice and Matt and I am excited to learn more and more about their practices and techniques.”

Patient Service Coordinator/Administrative Assistant

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“Hello everyone. My name is LuAnn and I am a transplant from Wisconsin currently in school for my nursing degree. I have been working with the Zen Healing Center since late December of 2015 and have immensely enjoyed the staff here as well as the clientele we serve. The atmosphere here has been amongst one of the best I have had the short privilege of working in. The providers are passionate about their work and truly care for their patients as nobody here is a number, but a unique individual with personal, customized plans. They don’t aim to treat symptoms, but to help get to the root cause and aid the body in healing itself. They aim for true well-being. It is an experience that ought to be experienced by yourself if you are, at all, a bit curious about what we have to offer!”

Patient Service Coordinator

“Hi all, my name is Chee Vang. I started working here in November 2015. IMG_5378I work at Zen Healing Center part-time and work full-time at Anthem, Inc. The past months that I’ve been here has been great. All the employees here are super friendly and helpful to one and another. Honestly, I’ve never knew how chiropractic works, but having Dr. Zen educating me and learning what he does to patients, has really helped me understand his technique of Gonstead.”

Patient Service Coordinator

My name is Matt Williamson. I began my journey at ZHC in May 2015. Matt Photo copyI have had a lot of fun learning from Dr Zen and Alice. I continually am driven to learn new innovative ways to help people heal. I have a variety of ways to accomplish this goal The most important part of my job is always understanding what the needs are of each individual person. The most rewarding part of my job is knowing that I am part of a team who is always doing their best to help people leave us healthier and happier.

Matt Williamson CMT, Cert. ART

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Oriental Medicine Day!! @ Zen Healing Center

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Perfecting Your Posture at Work: Spinal Hygiene

 Proper Lifting Techniques:

  1. Stand perpendicular to the object.
  2. Start by bending your knees.
  3. Put your arm under the object such as a box.
  4. Lift with your legs first.
  5. Slide the object up to your pelvis.
  6. Than lift with your arms.
  7. No turning, no bending all the way with your back, and do not try to carry weight that you cannot lift.lifting posture2

Proper Lifting: Bad and Good Examples

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Ergonomically Correct Posture:

With long hours spent at your desk, it can be difficult to keep good posture. To prevent your spine from taking on a “C” form, it is important to take steps to reduce your spinal pressure by sitting correctly so that your spine falls into its natural “S” position. Good posture can substantially improve the way your back and neck feel at the end of your workday Here are a few suggestions from The Back Store and Spine-health.com to help you improve your posture at work:

Sitting

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  • Use a footrest: Purchase a footrest or use old phone books that are approximately four inches high. This will raise the height of your knees and effectively changes your center of gravity backwards, helping you to improve your posture.
  • Sit close to your desk: Be as close to the edge as possible. It will prevent you from bending forward over the desk.
  • Keep your back supported when sitting: When you will be sitting for long periods, you should make sure your back is supported from the lumbar region (lower back) to at least the shoulder blades. The chair you sit in should support the whole spine, right up to the neck. To avoid bending your neck to look down, try placing a small lectern on the desk or tabletop.
  • Take stretch breaks: If you are sitting for a long period of time, get up and stretch for a few seconds at least once every hour.

Standing

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  • Tilt your pelvis slightly forward (towards your rib cage): Tighten your abdominals and keep your head directly over your shoulders and pelvis. Try not to pull your shoulders back, as this may actually worsen y our posture. If it is hard for you to hold this position, try placing your feet slightly apart with one foot in front of the other and bend your knees a little.
  • Use a railing or box to prop one foot up: This will take some of the pressure off your back. You can also place a rubber mat on top of a concrete floor to help ease pressure.
  • Change your feet and positions at least every 20 minutes: This will keep your back from getting “stuck” in the same position.
  • Slightly bend at the knees: This is keep pressure off the knee joint, hips, ankles, and lower back. This will also help with circulation and a good work out for the legs.

Your Workstation

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For optimum comfort, you should assess your workstation and make changes based on the types of tasks you do on a daily basis, and the amount of time spent sitting or standing. Spine-health.com offers these tips for creating a more comfortable work environment:

  • Take your task in consideration when choosing a surface height for your desk: For example, an architect will need a higher surface for drawing, but a person who works on a computer all day will more than likely want a desk surface where they can sit or stand, depending on the need to use other tools or references.
  • Adjust the seat of the office chair:
    • Your work surface should be elbow-high.
    • Your fist should be able to pass easily behind your calf and in front of the edge of the seat to keep your legs from being pressed too hard and your feet from swelling.
    • Two fingers should slip easily under your thigh. If not, place a footrest under your feet to raise your knees to the same level as your hips.
    • The backrest of your chair should push your lower back forward slightly.
  • Fix the height of your computer screen: Sit comfortably at your desk and close your eyes. Slowly reopen them. Where you first gaze is the place to put the center of your screen. You can easily raise you screen with books or a stand if need be.

Protect Your Eyes From Computer Eye Strain

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Computer Desk Eye Bloodshot

Nearly 75 million Americans spend many hours a day working in front of a computer.  Over 50 percent report some form of eye strain, including eye fatigue, dry eyes, burning eyes, light sensitivity, blurred vision, and headaches as well as pain in the shoulder, neck or back.

If you are one of those suffering from computer eyestrain, here are some steps to take to protect your eyes and reduce eyestrain:

  • Have your eyes examined annually by an eye doctor.  If you wear glasses, consider a pair of glasses specifically designed for computer use. Also, consider glare coating on your lenses.
  • Select a computer monitor with a larger and flat screen.
  • Place your screen 20 to 26 inches away from your eyes and the top of the screen at or a little below eye level.  The monitor distance should allow you to read the screen without leaning your head, neck, or trunk forward or backward.  Adjust text size as needed for ease in reading.
  • To reduce glare, place your monitor perpendicular to a window, adjust or add window blinds, and reduce interior lighting to lower glare and reflections.  Use a task light that shines only on your paper.
  • Use an antiglare screen on your computer.
  • Take a vision break every 20 minutes or so and look, at an object 20 feet or more away to relax your eye muscles.
  • Blink your eyes regularly and more often to rewet your eyes and avoid dryness and irritation.  Use artificial tears if needed to lubricate your eyes.
  • Use a document holder placed next to your computer screen so you do not have to turn your head back and forth or constantly refocus your eyes.
  • Alternate your computer work with non-computer tasks to give your eyes a rest.

Frequently Asked Questions for Massages

Massage FAQs

7 Questions to ask yourself before getting a massage:

  1. Have you ever had any massage?
  2. How long was the longest massage you have had?
  3. Do you know what kind of massage(s) you have had?
  4. How long has it been since your last massage?
  5. Do you know what kind of techniques the practitioner used?
  6. What kind of pressure do you like? If you are unsure that’s ok too.
  7. Are you currently in pain?

*People who generally do not pay attention to how they feel are far more likely to wait too long to seek treatment of any kind.

Is there more than 1 kind of massage?

  • Massage is like food. You will feel different depending on the type of massage an pressure being applied.

What happens before a massage?

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  • First timers please be 10-15 minutes early. You will have to fill out an intake form before the massage begins. This is similar to a doctor’s visit. Pertinent medical information needs to be written down so the therapist can make sure to NOT hurt you. Some medications and medical conditions are direction contraindications for massage.
  • If you have been doing yard work and your body hurts everywhere, this is the time to speak up. Remember most people cannot read your mind, so asking questions and giving information is the best way to ensure you get the most out of your massage.

What happens when the massage is over?

  • Your therapist will leave the room and you may now get up and put your clothes back on.
  • IMPORTANT: do not get up quickly. While laying down your body has adapted to this position. Before moving, take a few breaths, role to your side and slowly sit at the side of the table and take a few more breaths.

What now?

  • The therapist may give you stretches to try or inform you of nutritional concepts or any number of things.stretch_02a
  • Your therapist will meet you in the hallway or outside the room. Usually you will be given water.
  • It is really important that you drink water for the rest of the day/night to flush out the toxins that have been removed from your muscles. Even very relaxing massages can have a great effect on how much toxin release there may be. The type of massage sometimes is not important because everyone detoxifies differently.
  • Some therapists have the ability to do a massage with the intention of your body recovering in a very specific way (i.e. you will continue to feel looser over the next few days, etc). It is important to listen to your therapist for their professional opinions about your body care and massage, because in many cases (not all), they will have a better understanding of how you should feel or what will keep you pain free. But good advice falls on deaf ears a lot.

How often should a person get massage?

  • The actual frequency of sessions should diminish over time. This means your body is feeling better for longer. “Maintenance” massage is a tricky term. Does maintenance mean every week for the rest of your life? Therapist who do not possess the ability to reduce session frequency either do not have the ability to do so (for a variety of reasons), or do not have the desire to do so.

Pain?

  • A relaxing massage doesn’t always mean pain free. Many people really enjoy knowing they will be receiving deeper pressure while others do not. The therapist should be communicating throughout the massage to make sure you are ok with the pressure that is being applied.
  • For a first time massage (if its only Swedish technique), think of a 1-10 scale *10 being unbearable pain). Do not go over 5-6. IF you are feeling a 7-8, say out loud “that’s too much pressure”, or “that’s too hard”. Remember mind readers are few and far between in this profession.
  • If a 7-8 feels good then it can be ok to receive, but if you do not know how your body recovers from massage, then its best for the first time to just relax or receive less pressure.
  • For deeper massages, a 7-8 is the target pressure you should be feeling. Endorphins (Enkephalin’s) are released in the body. Endorphins are the bodies natural pain killers.

**You have the power to end any massage if you feel the therapist isn’t listening,  or taking your needs into account, or being unprofessional.

**Therapist are trained to immediately end a massage if the client is inappropriate in any way.The truth: clients are thought of like meat or shapes. Our basic job is to tenderize you. To always keep things professional. A therapist will look at the body also in sections. Each shape and section of the body needs to function correctly so that other parts do not have to compensate for the lack of mobility in any particular area.

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I approach people with information I believe will be pertinent to you at any given time.